Program
Overview

16 weeks.
16 lessons.
16 stories from the world's best hockey players.

Focused on helping young athletes develop the research-backed 4Cs:

01

Competence:

The actual capability and skill that a child demonstrates in sport and ultimately outside of sport.

02

Confidence:

An internal sense of self-worth, which can be global in nature (how a child generally feels about him/herself) or situation specific (how a child feels about him/herself in a specific setting, domain, task, etc.)

03

Connection:

The feelings of identity and belonging, along with the experiences of quality relationships and support.

04

Character:

The behavioural tendencies and characteristics of how a child acts generally (integrity, resilience) and towards others (empathy, caring, support).

1616 is delivered weekly through a blend of:

01

Quality video content featuring “lived experience” stories from the best hockey players in the world that illustrate the 1616 principle of the week.

02

Guided in-person discussion prompts for coaches and parents.

03

On-ice drills created specifically to enhance the skills and physical performance of athletes while reinforcing the 1616 principle of the week.

04

Team and individual challenges to help participants apply and live out each 1616 principle including reflection questions.

05

Rewards and incentives to keep participants motivated and committed.

Building confidence through improved on ice performance.

We have teamed up with hall of famer and legendary skills coach Adams Oates to develop unique drills for each 1616 module.

These drills are specifically crafted to enforce each weekly lesson and improve the on-ice skills of participants.

Featuring stories from players like…

Andrew
Ladd

Rod
Brind’Amour

Patrick
Kane

Dustin
Byfuglien

Adam
Oates

Brent
Seabrook

Duncan
Keith

Max
Domi

Blayre
Turnbull

Anders
Lee

Torey
Krug

Connor
Carrick

Riley
Sheahan

Colin
Fraser

Troy
Brouwer

Mark
Giordano

How does the program work?

It’s more than a program or curriculum. It’s a multi-dimensional experience that engages many aspects of a young hockey player’s life, both at home and at the rink. 1616 weaves together a wide range of elements to create the most engaging and impactful experience possible, specifically tailored to 10-year-olds at their developmental stage. We’re designing the program to engage all learning styles in diverse environments that cement learning and make it stick for every participant.

With specific content and materials for players, parents, and coaches, each week follows a similar format, creating familiarity and consistency while keeping each week fresh and full of surprises.

What factors will contribute to the program’s success?

We’re confident that 1616 will be successful because we’re taking the following steps in designing the program to ensure its effectiveness:

01

Need Identification:
With the aim of putting knowledge into practice, 1616 has collaborated with end-users (hockey coaches, parents of 9 and 10-year-olds, and young hockey players) to ensure the program elements have the intended impact. We have also identified the research-informed knowledge that needs to be disseminated and implemented.

02

Marketplace assessment:
We’ve conducted a thorough marketplace assessment to identify similar programs that currently exist, teaming up with best-in-class practitioners while learning from their experience
and mistakes.

03

Credibility:
With access to the brightest hockey minds and high-profile professional athletes, 1616 will have immediate credibility within the hockey community which will accelerate program adoption and reach.

04

Partnerships:
1616 has established strong partnerships with organizations like the NHL Players’ Association, Canadian Mental Health Association, and more.

05

Expert contributors:
We have assembled a team of experts from various disciplines to work together to develop a best-in-class positive youth development (PYD) program. Together, this team has over 150 years of collective youth programming experience and includes a youth mental health curriculum development team, scholars, researchers, youth culture advisors, hockey advisors, and a media production and marketing team.

06

Data-driven approach:
We want this program to have an impact—we’re not hoping or guessing. We’re leveraging data and research in the development and evaluation of the program to blend proven methods and tools to maximize impact. We are working with a research team that is guided by a research-to-practice framework, ensuring that relevant knowledge is being adapted to the 1616 program.

07

Testing:
We’re developing 1616 in strategic phases and piloting the program with a test group of minor hockey teams spread across North America, before rolling it out more broadly, to test and measure the effectiveness of the program and how it can be improved before taking it to a wider market.

08

Measuring progress:
The program will use validated psychosocial assessments developed specifically for youth. Participants will take the assessment before starting 1616 to determine baseline levels of key development and wellbeing indicators. Participants then take the assessment again after completing the 16-week program to see how they
have improved.